Barton Springs

DCA>AUS

Mothersauce Partners went nationwide recently with an exploratory trip to Austin, TX. What an amazing city in the midst of an amazing time. There is a palpable energy to the town that is inescapable—what was for years a quiet capital is now undergoing explosive growth. It seems that everyone there is trying to figure out how to make it work.

The food and drink scene in Austin is in the midst of a powerful transformation in concert with the city’s growth as a whole. Standbys like barbecue and Tex-Mex are having to adjust as new concepts gain a foothold in the scene. Navigating this as a newcomer can be tricky, but it was made easier thanks to Rachel Charlesworth. Her Instagram, ATXEats, boasts almost 14,000 followers. If you want to know where to eat—just follow her.

Unfortunately, no one told me how to dress. After my third meeting where I was in a blazer and dress shoes, and the other party was in flip flops, I started to get Austin. I shed my DC armor and began to enjoy myself a bit more.

I tried to hit a lot of the spots—Launderette, Uchiko, Fleet Coffee, Easy Tiger, Tamale House East and so on—but there were just so many on the list.

A special shout goes out to the dynamic CEO of an Austin institution, Mason Ayer at Kerbey Lane Cafe. It was great to hear about the history of an iconic company and learn about what the future might hold for them.

Also, the kick ass team at SMGB Hospitality is ready to take over Austin—and beyond. Their upcoming project, Old Thousand will no doubt make an immediate impact. These guys are real pros. Thanks for all the time, gentlemen.

I think a lot about startup culture in this country and how it is always talked about in tech, but it is as prevalent in food as much as anywhere. Restaurants are startups—aspiring restaurateurs have a great idea to meet an under-served need, they scrounge for some capital, then they take a huge risk and hope to make it big. Austin is full of these people, as is DC, and it is a big part of what makes the cities great.

I was lucky enough to meet with some of these food startup folks down there who are ready to disrupt the Austin scene for the better, and I hope to have some info soon about how Mothersauce Partners will help them do it.

In the meantime, my last meeting summed up Austin perfectly. I had heard about Barton Springs Pool, a spring-fed pool in the middle of a city park, and I wanted to jump in before I left. Turns out the guy I met with last was a swimmer, and he offered to take me on the way to the airport—and jump right in with me. Now that is a cool guy, and it was a great meeting.

I started the trip in a sport jacket, and I finished it in board shorts. Thanks, ATX. I will be back soon.

barton-springs

second restaurant location

Introducing Mothersauce Partners: Restaurant Consulting and Investment Opportunities: A New Approach

I am excited to announce the launch of my new venture, Mothersauce Partners. Mothersauce is the culmination of a 20-year career in the greatest business in the world. I have spent my entire career behind bars, inside walk-ins and standing ruefully over grease traps–and I can’t imagine doing anything else. With Mothersauce, I hope to give a new generation of entrepreneurs the chance to achieve their dreams of ownership and be able to introduce their talents to a greater audience.

But first: The name, right? What does Mothersauce mean? Chefs will instinctively recognize the nod to French Chef August Escoffier, who is credited with elevating cooking to a respected and noble profession—in the late 19th century, mind you. It took some time for it to be as respected here in the U.S. Of the many things Escoffier did, perhaps most notable was to record and classify five basic sauces that form the backbone of French cooking—the mother sauces. These sauces provided the base for countless recipes that followed.

Cooking has come a long way since 19th century France. Many world cuisines have their own core ingredients and recipes, but to me the idea is the same now and wherever you go. Recipes always start with a solid foundation—how many recipes have you read that start with chopping an onion? Those recipes then grow, diverge, flourish and eventually become something completely new, but the ingredients for their success remain largely constant.

Through this venture, we aim to facilitate that “new.” Mothersauce Partners will provide the solid foundation—the mother sauce—from which these culinary entrepreneurs will launch their passions. With investment capital and seasoned expertise, we can offer them an opportunity to take that great leap.

We also want to continue to add to the culinary scene—and by extension, the culture and community—by selecting the talent with the true vision. We are looking for the rising stars who want to elevate their particular specialty to new heights and become impactful members of their communities. We will look to do right and do good.

I hope that many of you will join us. If you would like more information on investing, sign up on the site. If you are a concept and you are ready to talk, do the same.